The topic of white collar crime can bring up the mental image of middle-aged men in business suits. This stereotype downplays the wide range of people who can be accused of white collar crimes. As you may expect, North Carolina residents of any age, financial status, race and gender can be charged with a white collar crime.

White collar crime, as you may know, involves money in business settings. Women can be accused of white collar crimes, but as Forbes explains, their motivations can be quite different from men who are alleged to have committed a white collar crime. Similar to men, the women accused of this type of criminal activity may hold the position of office manager, accountant, bookkeeper or any other job in which they are given a great deal of trust and access to company funds. They may also be involved in the PTA, volunteer at their children’s school or work with an extracurricular organization in which their duties included handling financial transactions or being responsible for the treasury.

Women who have served time for embezzlement, forgery or other white collar crimes often say they were motivated to help their family or escape from financial difficulties. Often, they express regret and remorse for violating the trust of their employers or associates. On the other hand, men are often believed to be motivated more by power and control in similar crimes, which you may find surprising.

Regardless of the circumstances, you are entitled to a competent defense if you are accused of a crime. This post is not meant to replace the advice of a lawyer.